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BUILD's comments

NOV 02
Thanks mikedoeslife, we've fixed those links now.
OCT 27
Hi Rachel, Unfortunately we can't recommend specific products. I can, though, push this across our social media and see if anyone has any suggestions for you. Regards, The BUILD Team
OCT 09
It's a fixed light- for more information see here: http://yoy-idea.jp/works/peel/
JUN 22
Hello Wayne, Demi from the Australian Home Heating Association, has this advice for you: A wood heater installation, whether it is in a home or a shed, must comply with the Installation Standard AS/NZS2918. Regarding the smoke compliant, I suggest you look at what you are burning. Wet wood or treated wood can cause problems with smoke and it is strongly recommended you do not burn these, particularly treated wood as this can release chemicals which are harmful to your health. The flue may require cleaning, if it is blocked it may stop the unit from being able to draw air from the outside and therefore the performance of the unit may be impaired. I would also recommend you leave air controls open for a minimum of 20 minutes when you first light your fire and when you re-load giving the fire time to ignite correctly and you have a nice hot fire. For more information, visit www.homeheat.com.au Cheers, The BUILD team
MAY 15
If the original plan was technically correct then we don’t see why the builder doesn’t fix the issue which you say was caused by them not cutting- in the cooktop in the required position in the first place. We’re not sure why you have been asked to sign a variation as a variation is normally to change a plan but we gather you just want what was on the original plan. If the building surveyor is doing their job correctly, they should not allow an occupancy certificate – so it needs to be fixed. Exercise your right with your contract and design plan. Regards, The BUILD Team
MAY 12
Hi Amber, Demi Brown, from the Australian Home Heating Association (www.homeheat.com.au), has this advice: "Installation of a wood heater should be undertaken by a person qualified to do so. Installation instructions are provided with the wood heater when purchased but if this is a second hand unit, I would check if the unit been tested to the Australian Standard and if it complies with the requirements of emissions and efficiency. There are specific safety clearances provided when the unit is tested and these must be adhered to when installing any wood heater. My recommendation is to go back to the retailer you purchased your unit from and ask if they are able to install it or refer you to an installer who can safely install this in your home. Second hand units, particularly those that may be older than 10 years, could be unsafe and should not be installed."
APR 22
Hi Jennifer, You'll need a sink that's big enough to fit your largest pot or baking pan. For more information, have a look at this article: http://www.build.com.au/how-choose-sinks-and-taps It always pays to choose quality for kitchenware, after all you want this kitchen to last for years to come. Cheers, The BUILD team
NOV 12
Thanks Glassworks - article has been updated to reflect this.
NOV 11
Very clever - like how the power cable's hidden in the corner too.
OCT 06
Technically you're not wrong - but that paragraph's specifically talking about 'energy efficiency' and you're talking about 'thermodynamic efficiency'. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Efficient_energy_use http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_efficiency They might be 'thermodynamically efficient' at converting electrical energy to heat, but they're very 'energy inefficient' when compared with alternatives like air source heat pumps, which have coefficients of performance that allow them to produce four times as much heat using the same amount of electrical energy. Electric fan heaters are definitely an 'inefficient' way to heat a house!
OCT 01
Wow. Stunning in theory - hard to imagine living in a house like this though... Maybe with privacy glass? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SuLNAGpCVtU
JUL 25
Not 100% sure what you're referring to when you say a 'red filter bulb' - if you mean a regular incandescent bulb that's coloured/filtered red, then the answer's probably no. Heat lamps are designed with a special filament that optimises the way they give off energy (i.e. one made of quartz rather than tungsten). A regular tungsten bulb with a red filter is likely to be designed to give off energy as visible light more than infrared. If you want a lamp that works as a heat lamp - and specifically as a far infrared heat lamp - as far as we can tell you really need to get one that's designed for that...
JUN 03
Well spotted - thanks Geoff. We've just checked with the Australian Institute of Waterproofing, and they've confirmed that it's only Queensland and NSW where the work has to be done by someone with a licence. Updated this article to reflect that, sorry for the confusion!
JAN 08
Hi Kevin - this article was written with the assistance of a professional kitchen designer, pretty sure the details about what's common / standard are based on his advice. Please let us know if you think these figures / statements are wrong and we'll look into it!
DEC 03
Your best bet is to get in touch with the Australian Refrigeration Council (ARC) on that one Robert - someone there is bound to have more info for you. Here's their website: http://www.arctick.org/
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